Shortening antibiotic duration in the treatment of acute cholangitis: rationale and study protocol for an open-label randomized controlled trial

Published on 2020-01-18T04:44:13Z (GMT) by
Abstract Background Antimicrobial therapy with appropriate biliary drainage is considered the standard of care for acute cholangitis, but the optimal duration of antimicrobial therapy remains unknown. Seven to 10 days of antimicrobial therapy are common for the treatment of acute cholangitis, but a recent retrospective cohort study suggested a shorter duration might be effective. A shorter duration of antimicrobial therapy can be beneficial in decreasing the length of hospital stay, improving patients’ quality of life, decreasing adverse effects, and even contributing to a decrease in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance. Methods/design We will conduct a multi-centre, open-label, randomized, non-inferiority trial to compare short-course therapy (SCT) with conventional long-course therapy (LCT) in treating patients with acute cholangitis. SCT consists of 5-day intravenous antimicrobial therapy if the patients had clinical improvement, while at least 7 days of intravenous antibiotics will be provided to the LCT group. The primary outcome is clinical cure at 30 days after onset. Patients will be randomly assigned in an open-label fashion. A total sample size of 150 was estimated to provide a power of 80% with a one-sided α level of 2.5% and a non-inferiority margin of 10%. Discussion This trial is expected to reveal whether SCT is non-inferior to conventional LCT or not, and may provide evidence that one can shorten the treatment duration for acute cholangitis for the benefit of patients. Trial registration University Hospital Medical Information Network, UMIN000028382. Registered on 30 August 2017.

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Iwata, Kentaro; Doi, Asako; Oba, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Hiroo; Ebisawa, Kei; Nagata, Manabu; et al. (2020): Shortening antibiotic duration in the treatment of acute cholangitis: rationale and study protocol for an open-label randomized controlled trial. figshare. Collection. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4822425.v1